A hunger artist

hunger“Worry destroys the ability to write.”Ernest Hemingway

Maybe you’re familiar with Franz Kafka’s short story, A Hunger Artist, maybe you’re not. It doesn’t really matter. One of the main themes of the story (the way I see it) is the fact that artists most often feel misunderstood by their audience. And they’re furious because of that.

That’s a myth.

Most often than not it’s the artist’s inability to show people what he wants to show them that gets in the way. Continue reading

Broken or strong?

“Life breaks us all and afterward many are strong at the broken places.”Ernest Hemingway

You know what they say… what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. But I suppose that what doesn’t kill you simply makes you wish it did. And then, if you somehow find enough inner strength to go on, builds you up.

The things is, all that matters is the power that resides within us. It’s the power to be in control, to handle everything life throws at you.

But remember: what you give power to has power over you.

So don’t give up your power, don’t let the world break you. Fight on, no matter what. And, besides, strength is just the ability to keep moving forward long after you thought you couldn’t go on.

The boxing analogy

boxing_2_lgLet me tell you a bit about this sport called boxing. It’s tough and rough, no doubt about it. But the most difficult and painful parts are not the ones you see on TV. No, the fights themselves are just the parts that people get to see. The real fighting, the struggle, take place off-screen. The time spent practicing, hours and hours of physical training, shadow boxing, sparring. That’s the tough part. A few minutes in a ring with another fighter don’t even come close to what happens during a training. Continue reading

Being a writer

First, I’d like you to watch this video. It’s really short, and I assure you it won’t be a waste of your time. Then, I’d like to tell you how much I agree with what Chuck Lorre had to say about writing.

I’m an ardent believer in the fact that all great writing comes from a place of truth, from a place well hidden inside our soul. I believe that those elements that are based on our own experiences, faults, and beliefs give substance to a story. I can see many writers who are reluctant about that. I can also understand why. It’s the most difficult thing to do. Once you start writing about yourself, in one way or another, you realize how difficult it really is. Continue reading

The Struggle

struggleIn an essay about Kafka, David Foster Wallace wrote the following words, “the horrific struggle to establish a human self results in a self whose humanity is inseparable from that horrific struggle. […] our endless and impossible journey toward home is in fact our home.”

Now, he was talking about Kafka’s works, but I think that phrase pretty much sums up what life is all about. Continue reading

I have loved the stars too fondly…

night skyThough my soul may set in darkness,

it will rise in perfect light.

I have loved the stars too fondly

to be fearful of the night. – Sarah Williams
Words are our most important discovery. Forget about fire, forget about all the places we’ve been to, and all the places we’ll reach. Words allow us to see farther than any telescope. And, at the same time, words allow us to see inside each and everyone of us, to see every lever and gauge and all the other tiny elements that make us work. 
Sometimes you read something a stranger wrote on a lonely night and you feel less lonely. You feel like you somehow know them, and your only regret in the world is that you haven’t read their words sooner.  Continue reading

I need your help

From time to time I contemplate the idea of abandoning my dream of becoming a full time writer. I get all kinds of ideas in my head. I’m just pretending to be a writer, and I’m not really good enough, and that I should simply give up.

A couple years ago, before I started this blog, one of my uncles asked me about my writing. Back then I was uploading stories on Wattpad, and I was having a lot of fun. So I told him that I had talked with a girl from Etiopia, who said that she really enjoyed my stories. So much that she cried.

And, well, he asked me about money. Was I earning enough?

In fact, I wasn’t making money at all. And I told him that, and I told him that when a stranger genuinely appreciates your art, that’s worth more than all the money in the world.

I was happy back then. Continue reading