We need superheroes

DeathofsupermanI “created” my first superhero when I was five years old. His name was Captain Hank, and he possessed super-human strength, speed, and he couldn’t age. That was all, basically.

Then, of course, I had to make some villains, and then some other superheroes to aid Hank in his fight against evil.

To some, the concept of  superheroes acts simply as a metaphor for greatness. It can be easily understood by almost anyone, regardless of age, education, culture, and so on. I never actually agreed with this definition.

I believe the concept itself is so primordial that most of us actually miss the point entirely. My definition is that superheroes are characters who possess certain abilities and traits that make them better than normal people in many ways.

But they also have flaws and weaknesses, and they make mistakes. Continue reading

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Baz Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby

The-Great-Gatsby-Baz-Luhrmann-myLusciousLife.com-Carey-Mulligan-Leonardo-DiCaprioMost of you already know that F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is my favorite novel. I’ve made a custom out of reading it once a year, so I just had to go see the movie on the night it premiered here in Constanta.

And I wasn’t dissapointed.

Baz Luhrmann managed to produce a movie with strange qualities, most of which will appeal only to those who have read and loved Fitzgerald’s novel. When it comes to book to movie adaptations, most producers are maybe too keen to leave their own mark, to change things and show us what they see. Luhrmann shows us how this decade sees this classic novel, how our decade sees decadence and opulence and slowly peels off all the greedy, dark layers of human nature in this modern world. Continue reading

Movies about writers

I’m not trying to write a top of the best movies about writers. I’m just making a list of the ones that I really enjoyed – for various reasons of course.

Finding Forrester (2000)

In a way, I just couldn’t start with any other  movie, simply because Finding Forrester was so cute and sweet and sincere that I almost cried at the end.

Starring Sean Connery and his manly voice in the role of William Forrester, a very successful and yet reclusive writer, this movie actually has some pretty good advice on writing. Continue reading

Art and violence

Yesterday I read this article by super famous film critic, Roger Ebert, about news coverage, not movies, being the reason why some people go berserk and stuff. And it got me thinking.

Could art influence people in such a way that they start shooting each other? Do we absorb the violence we see in movies and video games? Do we try to apply what we see in the real world?

Interesting.

It really is fascinating to see that some people believe that we can’t really discern what’s real from what’s not, that we don’t understand that the general convention of art is that it’s not true. As close as art and the real life are, we know art only mimics real life. And it does show for a reason. To transmit a message. Continue reading

Friday Review: To Live and Die in L.A.

A while back I was reviewing books and movies on my blog. For no reason at all I stopped doing so. But now we have a new category thing: Friday Review. Let me explain.

I read 2-3 books per week. I also watch a lot of movies and TV shows. Because of the nature of my job I don’t get out too much. And my imaginary friend, Adrian, doesn’t like to be bothered too often, so I have no one to recommend all these movies and books to. That’s why every Friday I’ll review a book or a movie or a TV show. I’ll choose the ones that I’ve liked most (and the ones I think you’ll like as well) and tell you about the good parts and the bad parts. So they’re more like recommendations than reviews. Anyway, I don’t get paid for these reviews, so they’re not advertorials or anything.

Today I’m going to recommend a thriller.

To Live and Die in L.A. , a 1985 movie based on the eponymous novel written by Gerald Petievich, tells the story of two secret agents, Richard Change ( William Peterse) and John Vukovich (John Pankow), as they attempt to arrest Rick Masters (Willem Dafoe), who’s probably the reason why I loved this movie. Dafoe’s character, basically a counterfeiter, is just smart and evil enough to make the movie worthwhile. Continue reading

Mr. Nobody

How difficult is it to take a decision? One you’ll never take back? What if you’d know where that decision is going to take you?

Mr. Nobody ( as opposed to my short story) is a 2009 movie starring Jared Leto as Nemo Nobody,  a 118 years old man telling a reporter all about the labyrinth of decisions that is his life. Continue reading

Match Point

I have to admit that I’m not Woody Allen’s biggest fan. He’s extremely talented and has produced and directed a lot of movies, but even when I did like his stuff, movies like Deconstructing Harry or Vicky Cristina Barcelona, I still got the impression that there was something missing – one more ingredient to make them perfect. And I felt as if Allen carefully builds his characters to a certain point, after which he just gives up and abandons his character to find their own way toward the end. Continue reading