The Colorful Language of Roadside Diners

Bookshelf

alex atkins bookshelf wordsSeveral decades ago, if you sat down at the counter of a cozy, little roadside diner and ordered breakfast, let’s say you ordered two scrambled eggs on toast, the waiter or waitress would spin around and call out to the cook, “Adam and Eve on a raft and wreck em!” These calls, known as diner or hash house lingo, were a part of the culture of roadside diners and luncheonettes that sprouted across the nation during the 19th and 20th centuries. Not only were the calls enormously entertaining, they were a very efficient way to place food orders. Although the etymology of hash house is difficult to trace, the calls that endured possessed two key qualities: they had to be whimisical, and they had to be distinct so as not to be easily confused with the calls.

As you can imagine, listening to the colorful hash house lingo was one…

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