The Art of Writing

I don’t write as much as I used to. To be honest, I don’t know why that happened. Or how. Don’t you find it frustrating that we live in a world that makes it almost impossible to admit that you don’t know something?

I don’t know why I don’t write as much as I used to. Yes, I write blog posts. On two different blogs. But those have become an almost subconscious habit. It’s scary in a way. I can write blog posts anywhere, anytime, no matter the conditions, my mood… I can write anywhere.

It is scary because I used to approach writing with a lot more respect and admiration. As if it were magic. Don’t get me wrong, words are magic. If you use the right words in just the right order, you can change the world a bit. But my words are no longer magic. My words are the words of someone who has become so absorbed by the pettiness of life that he can no longer create. He is no longer the creator, but rather the creation.

I am the side-effect of all the words I wrote when I was a dreamer.

I remember those days with the kind of nostalgia that usually breaks one’s heart. I was dirt poor, struggling in all areas of life, yet I was fascinated by the fact that my words meant something to someone. A few people at first. Then more and more. I read each comment and thank-you e-mail with the kind of dumbfounded expression on my face that sometimes made it easy for me to cry.

Actual people read my words. And they cared enough about them to tell me this.

Real people. You understand this? Human beings, taking precious moments of their time to read something that this 22 year old kid from Romania wrote whenever he felt that he had something to say.

I felt invincible. For a while I even was.

My dream ever since I first started writing was simple: become the youngest writer to ever receive the Nobel Prize, and the second writer to receive both a Nobel Prize and an Academy Award. Nothing too complicated. Nothing to worry about.

They say that the road to hell is paved with good intentions. And adverbs. Maybe it’s paved with both. Or neither. Maybe it’s paved with the tears of all the dreamers who stop believing in their dreams during the day, yet can’t help themselves late at night.

I don’t know when it happened or how or even why, but at some point I stopped writing when I felt I had something to say. I wrote because I had to say something. I had to keep blogging, I had to keep growing an audience, to earn a living by doing the only thing I was ever somewhat good at.

As a consequence, I stopped believing in the magic of words. In the art of writing. There was nothing wonderful about it.

Blogging felt like work. Felt like the kind of work that you pray to all the gods to make it end. To just make something happen in a way that it could make it all end…

I got sidetracked by secondary activities, it is true. I lost heart. Sometimes I’d lay awake at night and wonder if I still had a heart.

It happens. Even to the best of us.

Life breaks us all. No matter what.

I am writing these words because I feel the need to recover whatever it was that I lost along the way. This sense of wonder when it comes to the written word. I need it, because without it I am no one in particular.

Funny. I used to think I was no one because I spent so much time writing. A perfect mister nobody.

I read this interesting anecdote a few days ago:

Adam trudged past the gates of Eden, his head low, his feet heavy with remorse and pain.

Then he stopped, spun around and exclaimed, “Wait a minute! You had this all planned! You put that fruit there knowing I would eat from it! This is all a plot!”

There was no reply.

Without failure, we can never truly reach into the depths of our souls. Only once we have failed can we return and reach higher and higher without end.

What I am really trying to say is that I have spent years denying the magic of words, their power, their authority. I have betrayed myself and those who once believed in my words.

Maybe one does have to lose his way in order to figure out the location of his true path. And why he wants to walk it. And where it leads to.

Maybe not all those who wander are lost. Maybe they are searching for what can only be found inside their hearts. They don’t know it yet, so they walk around, looking everywhere but within themselves.

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22 thoughts on “The Art of Writing

  1. Christian, this is one of your most heartfelt pieces of writing I have read so far in the last six months I have started blogging and reading your works.You have really poured your heart out and I can understand the stagnation and the frustration one feels after writing incessantly for so long.
    Hope you feel the magic again in the writing so that you can continue to work form the heart.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I hear you. But since I starting writing around the age of 8 or 9 and making up characters (I had friends and played outside but for me writing and making up characters was far more interesting) and after getting involved with listening to rock music and then getting involved singing and guitar with a local band that never really accomplished anything and deciding to turn my characters into a rock band in fiction, and then working out the script…now that I have self publishing experience and can now use social media and am retired at age 65, writing is my way of connecting spiritually, to God and to the world.

    Liked by 3 people

  3. This is so much more profound than your other pieces. The reasons, and the factors just seem so inevitable.

    But, one thing I’d like to say – you still got it mister! You’ve still got that thing where you can make the reader FEEL things. It was big in this article, and the loyal audience is sticking with you, even if you write only blog posts. I’m here for it! :)

    Liked by 3 people

  4. Cristian, I have been reading the book, “Falling Upward,” by Richard Rohr. He believes that periods of struggle are all inevitable, necessary and good parts of the human journey — and that you need them to grow. If I understand him correctly, he believes that the habitual and familiar patterns we establish in our lives are falsely reassuring and that sometimes life (or God, if you believe) gives us a “push” to insure we develop into the person we are meant to be. You have a great gift for writing. Even without the Nobel Prize and Academy Award, your writings have touched people. But they touch people because your passion comes through. In truth, I have not noticed a change in your writing but neither have I been following your blog very long. (I am new to blogging.) Perhaps life is giving you a push to realize that your blog may no longer be a means to an end for you, but has become the end goal — as you hinted. If so, I hope you will make the changes you need to make so blogging becomes subordinate to your art and writing becomes enjoyable to you again.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you for reading, and for your comment.

      Yes, struggle is inevitable. It’s also necessary and helpful. Without it, we’d be unable to even figure out who we are or what we’re capable of. There would be no reason to do anything at all.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Oh, Cristian, your writing is indeed magic, if only to the few of us. You were the first few people I started following when I decided to start a blog and put all my pieces of writing together. This post hits home because I must admit I’m no stranger to the feeling you’re experiencing and should it comfort you in the tiniest way that you’re not alone on this journey where life has sapped the zest of words and intertwined your mind and sucked away the energy in the form of petty things. I must say that even though things go south, which occur just too much in my realm of the world, we as writers should believe in the magic of words. For it is the only thread that binds our souls to this fragile world where the truth fades as quickly as a single drop of sweat on the forehead of a farmer tending hay on a burning day of June!

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Thank you for writing this. It’s really a great and heartfelt piece, and I can tell you put a lot into it. I’m now going to make a point to never lose the magic of writing– after all, if that’s gone then what’s the point?

    Liked by 3 people

  7. Cristian, that’s one piece of work I ll remember. Its a writers lamentation to me. Such expression of the drowning zeal of the magic of writing, attests to the trials of a gifted artist(writer). You can win the Noble prize, You can win the award, you gotta keep writing, there’s a light at the end of the tunnel!
    This is a stage in the life of every great writer.keep at it

    Liked by 3 people

  8. Very beautiful article, different and more profound, maybe almost touching the truth. I am sure you know better, but if you dedicate all your creative time to blogging, which is your work, you will have nothing left to venture in a different journey. You have the talent to write a masterpiece, perhaps you could reserve a little time every day to only focus on that one goal. Check Growing Gills from Jessica Abel, maybe you get inspiration. Thank you for inspiring all of us but let your passion fly again!!🙏🙏💖🌞🌸

    Liked by 3 people

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