Strong People Never Have Easy Pasts

Most people wish for safety and comfort, and they wish their lives away. The more they want comfort, the more discomfort they seem to get. In fact, it is their minds that grow bitter, weak, frail.

Luck, karma, whatever…

Strong people believe that they make their own luck. The harder they work, the luckier they get.

Weak people?

They think otherwise.

Outside factors don’t matter. They are beyond one’s control anyway. Why think of them? Why hope the tides of fortune turn, when you yourself have done nothing to prepare for such an eventuality?

Luck is such a relative term, and always dependant on one’s perception.

The struggle alone pleases us, not the victory.

Remember that.

If you are panicky about money, no matter how much you have, you’ll always feel like not having enough. In fact, the more you’ll have, the worse you’ll feel because you have more to lose now.

We go up, we go down, that is the way of the universe.

And we must never, ever fight against this, or try to imagine into existence a time or place when this rule does not apply anymore, because such a thing does not exist.

The lottery winner loses all his has gained because he did not have the emotional resilience to not be overwhelmed by his vast wealth.

As the saying goes, no sleep is worth a damn unless it’s earned.

What you fight for tends to last.

Also, the terrible cliche of “easy come, easy go.”

I do not advise you to wish for struggle, but that you should merely embrace it when it comes your way. And that you must understand the following aspect of living: if you do what is hard, your life will be easy. Do what is easy, and your life will be hard.

Embrace struggles as their own breed of opportunities.

As Marcus Aurelius so eloquently put it, the obstacle is the way. More often than you’d think.

16 thoughts on “Strong People Never Have Easy Pasts

  1. Brilliant post… especially like the Marcus Aurelius quote of ‘the obstacle is the way’. I’ve been diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease some 15 years ago and have only come to this conclusion roughly 5 years ago… A bit of a waste of a decade.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I love it ! Words of wisdom, indeed. Thanks for enlightening us with some much needed perspective. Sometimes we fail to remember that it is during the Climb to the mountaintop in which our deepest fears are faced and overcomed, and our character is forged in such an unbreakable way that nothing, later on in life, can stop us from surpassing and overcoming seasons like such with a big grin on our face and faith in our hearts.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I agree with your main point. However, I wouldn’t mind trading in my childhood trauma and neglect for a “normal” childhood. I guess it’s made me stronger but it’s also the main reason why I suffer from mental illnesses now.

    Like

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