The Pagliacci Effect

Heard joke once: Man goes to doctor. Says he’s depressed. Says life seems harsh and cruel. Says he feels all alone in a threatening world where what lies ahead is vague and uncertain. Doctor says, “Treatment is simple. Great clown Pagliacci is in town tonight. Go and see him. That should pick you up.” Man bursts into tears. Says, “But doctor… I am Pagliacci.

Alan Moore, Watchmen

Oftentimes there’s a big difference between what we’re able to decipher about a person, what we see at the surface, and what lies underneath it all. There’s a big difference between appearance and essence.

I’m going to do the obvious here and use myself as an example.

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Even Angels Have Their Demons

From an early age, Marcus Aurelius seemed destined to become a philosopher-king.

The emperor Hadrian called him verissimus, meaning “most true and truthful.”

Adopted into the line of succession of the Roman Empire at the age of 17, Aurelius pursued knowledge of the truth with undying passion.

He’s often regarded as one of the wisest men to have ever lived, often ranking in second after Socrates, and one of the few virtuous and humble emperors of ancient Rome. Evidence of Aurelius’ pursuit of the truth lies in the image that is painted through a series of notes he wrote to himself, known by the name of Meditations.

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The Psychology of FUN

When we think of the word fun, we think frivolous acts of non-work. However, I would venture to say that fun does equal productive work. Fun is worthy of our time. Fun is drawing us into our very own creativity, and we will produce our purpose and share this joy with others as much as we possibly can. Psychological studies have proven the productive value of fun.

Hear me out for a moment…

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