How to Fall in and Out of Love With Your Muse

“There is a muse, but he’s not going to come fluttering down into your writing room and scatter creative fairy-dust all over your typewriter or computer. He lives in the ground. He’s a basement kind of guy. You have to descend to his level, and once you get down there you have to furnish an apartment for him to live in. You have to do all the grunt labor, in other words, while the muse sits and smokes cigars and admires his bowling trophies and pretends to ignore you. Do you think it’s fair? I think it’s fair. He may not be much to look at, that muse-guy, and he may not be much of a conversationalist, but he’s got inspiration. It’s right that you should do all the work and burn all the mid-night oil, because the guy with the cigar and the little wings has got a bag of magic. There’s stuff in there that can change your life. Believe me, I know.”

Stephen King, On Writing

I can’t tell you where to find your muse-guy. It might be a corner-booth in a crowded bar. It might be in your own house, in your own bed, as you struggle to fall asleep.

You might even find your muse in the subway, as you ride home after work.

Stranger things have happened.

I can tell you only that when you find this muse, every civilized instinct in your soul will disappear. You’ll suddenly feel this itch, impulsive as hell, a complete disregard for rules or consequences.

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Why I Decided To Build Both irevuo and the Art of Marketing on Ghost

In case you’ve missed it, this year I’m designing, building, and launching a new project every month, using mostly no-code or low-code tools and platforms.

In January, I’ve launched blogsy, a hybrid built in WordPress and Adalo. It’s still a work in progress, as I doing a complete overhaul of the platform that allows you to submit blogs and articles.

As a sidenote, that’s what I’ve decided along the way, that I’d allow myself to blend and refine , going back and forth and changing a lot of things.

For instance, what I launched as The Art of Marketing in February has become The Toolbox, a curated list of hundreds of resources for bloggers, marketers, and content creators, while The Art of Marketing became its own blog.

This month’s project became irevuo, a platform dedicated to helping modern polymaths connect seemingly unrelated dots and apply knowledge acquired from various disciplines in their own lives or creative endeavors.

Both The Art of Marketing and irevuo are built on Ghost, and I believe this requires a bit of an explanation, because I’ve been building and launching blogs on WordPress since 2012.

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2021 Challenge: A New Project Every Month

Last year taught me many valuable lessons, not the least of which was this: threats and opportunities are much closer to one another than they seem to be.

And, as cliched as it sounds, it’s all about mindset.

That’s why I’ve decided to do something a bit unusual.

Every month I’ll be launching a new project, and I will walk you through the process, the failures, everything.

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The One Question You Should Always Ask Yourself Before Pursuing a Goal

Photo by Content Pixie on Unsplash

Goals are essential to our happiness. Working towards a worthy goal ensures that we live a life that is meaningful and fulfilling.

If so, why do we fail at most of our goals? Why do we struggle with motivation?

If our vision of the future is so compelling, if we know why we want it, if we know how to get it, then why do we struggle to do it?

I believe it all comes down to the fact that we never ask ourselves this simple question, a question that perhaps you don’t even want to think about, let alone answer.

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If You Want It, You’ve Got to Act As if It’s Already Yours

Photo by Amy Hirschi on Unsplash

There’s this fun experiment I’d often try with folks. I’d ask them to imagine themselves winning the lottery.

They’d tell me all the things they’d do with the money, all the places they’d travel to, all the stuff they’d buy.

It was then that I’d ask them to tell me how they’d feel. Would they act differently? Would they talk differently? What about they way they’d carry themselves? Their demeanor, the way they’d walk? Would that change as well.

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