magic“Four years before I had written Soldiers’ Pay. It didn’t take long to write and it got published quickly and made me about five hundred dollars. I said, Writing novels is easy. You don’t make much doing it, but it is easy. I wrote Mosquitoes. It wasn’t quite so easy to write and it didn’t get published quite as quickly and it made me about four hundred dollars. I said, Apparently there is more to writing novels, being a novelist, than I thought. I wrote Sartoris. It took much longer, and the publisher refused it at once. But I continued to shop it about for three years with a stubborn and fading hope, perhaps to justify the time which I had spent writing it. This hope died slowly, though it didn’t hurt at all. One day I seemed to shut a door between me and all publishers’ addresses and book lists. I said to myself, Now I can write. Now I can make myself a vase like that which the old Roman kept at his bedside and wore the rim slowly away with kissing it. So I, who had never had a sister and was fated to lose my daughter in infancy, set out to make myself a beautiful and tragic little girl.” – William Faulkner, An Introduction to The Sound and The Fury

I’m sure you’ve heard of the term “art for art’s sake.” I’ve always considered it to be one of the most crucial stages any artist must go through.

It’s easier said than done, mostly because we feel life’s a competition. We play to win, and the pleasure of simply playing the game is not enough. Continue reading

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From Life to Death

CRACK.

Thunder crashed, tearing the sky asunder. A storm of apocalyptic proportions. But Martha didn’t jump as so many of her neighbors did. She’d been expecting it since she was five.

The year she died.

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Review: The Genie Hunt by M.C. Tuggle

Buddy Vuncannon, an attorney in High Point, North Carolina, and his friend Coot Pickard are heading out of town for a fishing weekend when they’re surrounded by a SWAT team. Three eyewitnesses have identified Coot as the gun man in the latest of a string of robberies. To defend Coot, Buddy must stand up to a bullying district attorney, uncover the identity of the real robbers, and battle a powerful genie who serves the robbers. Buddy’s investigation implicates an old friend, reigniting long-forgotten friction between Buddy and Coot. Old and new loyalties clash, leading Buddy and Coot to a desperate chase that forces them to seek the help of a madman they both fear.

***

If you’ve read my previous reviews, you know I’m not the one to provide a synopsis of sorts, or write about the usual aspects of storytelling.

What matters most about the book, the essence of it, is the after taste, the way it makes you feel after having read it.

Is it worth it? Do you recommend it? Would you read it again?

The Genie Hunt by M.C. Tuggle is a short, fast read. The supernatural adds an interesting twist to a classical suspense storyline.

The main character, Buddy Vuncannon, is tasked with figuring out what the hell actually happened. He has to unravel the way the events actually unfolded.

This novel makes for an enjoyable read. Imagine reading the script for a popular TV show. Something like that.

Entertaining?

Yeah, I guess that is the right word.

A good, fast read, worth your time, especially if you enjoy the usual mystery with a bit of the occult thrown in there for good measure.

The Genie Hunt is available as an e-book on Amazon.

Letting Go

booksHere’s another thing that I do and might actually be of help to you: I write a story, a blog post, a novel, and then I let it go. Of course, not before I rewrite and edit the hell out of it. But I always let it go. The moment it goes live on Amazon or whatever, it’s no longer my book.

Not sure if it makes much sense. Continue reading

You and I through a thousand lives…

Here we are, holding hands at the edge of forever. Here we are, in the emptiness between stars. Here we are, waiting for another life.
Soulmates never die.

You know the legend the Ancient Greeks had about humans? That they once had four legs and four arms and heads with two faces? That Zeus, afraid of them being too powerful, decided to split them in half, damned them to spend a lifetime in search of their missing halves?

No, not a lifetime, but a thousand lifetimes…

Continue reading

Review: Tourmaline by Antwan Crump

Tourmaline:(A Collection of Things)- is the debut body of work by author Antwan Crump. Framed by testimonies to the absurdities of society at large, the four stories therein place readers at the penultimate point in the lives of several people forgotten by time.

This description does not do this book justice. It’s rather vague. But let me give you something that will:

She feared retribution enough to keep her nose clean on Sundays. Though that didn’t mean much for her liver.

We are all the sum total of the stories we tell ourselves. We are what we consistently do. All those habits, rituals, and vices. We are more what we fear than what we love.

The stories in Tourmaline teach us one thing: to be alive is a rather cynical business. Double standards and whatnot. The inherent absurdity of this is detailed by the erratic behavior of the characters. Simply put, the act of being alive has no purpose other than the one we give it. And we can give it any meaning we want, even though, looked at by more rational beings, we’re way beyond redemption.

There are no fairy tales here, just people and what people do best.

What do people do best you ask?

Stories, of course. The stories they tell themselves and anyone who’s willing to listen as to why they’re like this or like that. The stories they tell themselves over and over again in order to fall asleep or find a bit of hope.

At this age, I wouldn’t consider myself a runaway. A coward, maybe. I’ve lost enough. I’m not sure what awaits me out there on the country-side. I shudder to think it could be anything worse than what I’m leaving behind.

You can find Tourmaline on Amazon here. Give it a try. At $2.99, it’s well worth.

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Antwan Crump is a Novelist, Essayist, Humorist, Blogger, and Podcaster who can be found and contacted at atcrump.com.

 

The Blank Page

blankYou know what’s the one thing I find to be fascinating and terrifying at the same time?

A blank page. Just empty. No words, nothing.

It’s the scariest thing… because that page doesn’t care who you are or what you wrote, doesn’t care how many people are waiting to read your words… it just stays empty until you write something. Continue reading