Welcome to 2020: Beautiful and Terrible Things Are Going to Happen

You know those “terms and conditions” you have to read over and accept? Well, we should have been told that 2020 is going to be quite an interesting year… interesting in the sense that the stuff they write about in history books is going to happen almost every single month.

But this is not why I am writing these words.

An article by yours truly about 2020, and what’s going on, and how to best cope with the things that are going on.

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No, This Pandemic Is Not Going to Destroy Human Civilization

Many years ago, a student asked cultural anthropologist Margaret Meade a simple question; what was, in her opinion, the earliest sign of civilization.

You know, whether it was the discovery of fire, or the invention of the wheel. Or something of the sorts.

Her answer took him by surprise. She said the earliest sign of civilization was “a healed femur.”

You see, in the animal kingdom, where only the fittest survive, if you break your leg, you die. You cannot run from danger, you cannot drink or hunt for food. No creature survives a broken leg long enough for the bone to heal. You are eaten by predators long before that.

In the world of hunter-gatherers, a person with a fractured thigh bone would be thought of as useless and left to die.

But a femur that has healed is evidence that someone had taken the time to stay with the one who was injured, had bound up the wound, had carried the person to safety, and had hunted and gathered food for this injured person until their leg healed.

Someone had to provide care for another who couldn’t care for themselves.

Margaret Meade said that the evidence of compassion was the first sign of civilization.

We are only as strong as the weakest among us. That’s how it’s always been.

Do you know how we became the dominant species on the planet?

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Why You Shouldn’t Expect Change to Be Easy

We often forget that changing ones life does not happen during a four minute montage. Yes, we could make a four minute montage of how we got into fitness and lost a lot of weight and ended up being shredded.

No, this is not how things go in life.

“Man cannot remake himself without suffering, for he is both the marble and the sculptor” ― Alexis Carrel

Change is a painful and slow process. You have to struggle against a million voices in your head telling you that you shouldn’t do this or that.

The act of bettering oneself is not to be taken lightly.

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The Three Most Heartbreaking Truths of Life

Let’s be honest, okay? 

Life’s kind of short. I’ll be thirty in a few months, and — if I’m being honest— although it feels like I’ve been here forever, if I look back, it’s as if everything I’ve done so far has gone by in the blink of a second.

At my age, I’ve probably only got another a few more decades. You may not have much longer. I don’t say this to depress you — I say this to challenge you: What are you going to do with your time? Are you killing time or are you seizing it?

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Your Guide to Surviving #StayAtHome

This is probably the first time in history when we can save the human race by staying home, watching TV.

Even so, most people are screwing this up.

Why?

Because they make it seem like it’s worse than it is.

The truth is that we must learn to cope with the side-effects of isolation, of having to spend a lot of time indoors, and the truth is how we react during these times tells us who we truly are.

To some, it feels like a chance to change habits, to reset their minds, to focus on different things, while to others it feels like prison.

Heaven or Hell. The same situation, two different reactions.

Maybe it’s because Heaven and Hell aren’t place one gets sent to, but rather something we carry within us?

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Now, More than Ever, You Need to Be The Hero of Your Own Story

With this pandemic wreaking havoc among us, now it’s the time to become the hero of your own story.

Now, more than ever, you need to be in control of your thoughts and emotions, to be aware of your actions and their consequences.

Here are five ways you can become the hero of you own story during these troubling times…

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No Guts, No Glory

“When people say they’re skeptical, or pessimistic, I get it. But let’s face it, you’re gutless. It takes no guts to be a skeptic. It takes no guts to try nothing and say it’s not gonna work. It takes guts to put your ass on the line and believe something’s possible. It takes guts to pursue an answer. It takes guts to fail and step back up and keep pushing”

Tony Robbins

Your mind is designed in such a way to prevent you from getting hurt. In nature, this is a genius mechanism that ensures your survival. But in the our society, we have developed the “someday” mechanism.

Someday we’ll be good enough or brave enough or smart enough or have the time to do this or that.

Someday we’ll become what we’ve always wanted to be.

Someday we’ll write our book or start our business.

And most people wait their entire lives for this someday, which never comes.

Why?

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Life in The Time of Coronavirus

I don’t usually post my personal views on current events or popular topics, because I:

  1. usually don’t watch TV. At all.
  2. live in my own little world and keep focusing on the things that I have to do.

That being said, I thought I should address a few things that I’ve noticed in the past couple of weeks.

Number one… the sheer amount of misinformation.

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In These Trying Times… Remember… This Too Shall Pass

“But man is not made for defeat,” he said. “A man can be destroyed but not defeated.”

Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea

I believe that man can endure any “how.” I’ve always believed that.

We are capable of jumping off a cliff and growing a pair of wings on our way down. Each and every single one of us.

Thus, I am confident that we can overcome any obstacle, and that these hard times that we are facing right now are going to pass.

“This too shall pass,” as the saying goes.

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Depression. Suicide. Courage.

The so-called ‘psychotically depressed’ person who tries to kill herself doesn’t do so out of quote ‘hopelessness’ or any abstract conviction that life’s assets and debits do not square. And surely not because death seems suddenly appealing. The person in whom Its invisible agony reaches a certain unendurable level will kill herself the same way a trapped person will eventually jump from the window of a burning high-rise. Make no mistake about people who leap from burning windows. Their terror of falling from a great height is still just as great as it would be for you or me standing speculatively at the same window just checking out the view; i.e. the fear of falling remains a constant. The variable here is the other terror, the fire’s flames: when the flames get close enough, falling to death becomes the slightly less terrible of two terrors. It’s not desiring the fall; it’s terror of the flames. And yet nobody down on the sidewalk, looking up and yelling ‘Don’t!’ and ‘Hang on!’, can understand the jump. Not really. You’d have to have personally been trapped and felt flames to really understand a terror way beyond falling. – David Foster Wallace

Written by someone who ended up hanging himself, I think he knew what he was talking about.

Deciding to end one’s life needs quite a lot of contemplating on the subject. And, truth of the matter, we could debate the accuracy of such a description and all aspects of depression and suicide until the end of time, without arriving at a certain conclusion.

Maybe it’s got to do with emotional resilience. Maybe it’s got to do with neurological damage, with hormones and stuff. Continue reading