The Key Difference Between Successful and Unsuccessful People

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“Most of the challenges that we have in our personal lives come from a short-term focus”

Tony Robbins

The Stanford marshmallow experiment was a series of studies conducted by psychologist Walter Mischel in the late 1960s and early 1970s. In these studies, a child had to choose between receiving a small reward immediately or two small rewards if they waited for a short period, during which the tester left the room and then returned.

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The 5 People Who Will Break Your Heart in Your 20s

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Ah, your twenties. A decade of marvelous growth, decadent spending, and quite a few heartbreaks. Just like the 1920s.

That’s when you figure out a lot about life. What your teachers didn’t want to tell you, didn’t like to tell you, or didn’t know enough about to tell you.

That’s when you’ll probably fall in and out of love with life, with your soulmate, with your passion. That’s when you will get your heart broken, and when you should fail at something you were passionate about.

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Don’t Try. Be

Photo by pawel szvmanski on Unsplash

“Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.”

Steve Jobs

Charles Bukowski almost didn’t become the writer he had always dreamt of being. He worked in a post-office until his fifties, even though he tried and often failed to earn enough from his writing so he could quit his job.

Abraham Lincoln failed time and time again. He lost his bid for State Legislature when he was 23 years old. Six years later, he lost his bid to become Speaker in the Illinois House of Representatives.

In 1848, at the age of 39-years old, Lincoln failed to become Commissioner of the General Land Office in D.C. Ten years later, he failed to become a U.S. Senator.

Colonel Harland Sanders is another famous failure. It was not until he was 65 years old, with just $105 to his name, that he set out to sell his franchise. He was rejected by 1,009 restaurants before one agreed to his business model.

If we try, we might fail. If we give it our all, we might fail. 

Sometimes I do believe the universe tests our commitment, and I often find that the people who try and fail, never, ever want to try again.

So, what’s the trick?

Simple. The trick is to be.

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The Paradox of Changing Oneself to Get Rid of Negative Traits

The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change.” — Carl Rogers

Every night is a dark night of the soul; fear and loathing overwhelm you whenever you stare in a mirror or think about your actions. You fail at everything you do. You struggle with low self-esteem, high-functioning depression, and social anxiety.

How do you change that?

Because you’re not going to change by spending all the time wishing you didn’t feel like that; you’re not going to change by writing down a bunch of positive affirmations and reading them aloud in front of the mirror every morning.

The paradox of changing oneself is that the more you want to change a negative trait you have, the more you become it.

When it comes to getting what we want, desire is an important element. Set a goal, go all in, and achieve it. The beach body, the business, or the book you want to write, all require that you genuinely want to do them.

But when it comes to changing the inner reality of who we are, it doesn’t work that way.

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George Floyd’s Death: It’s Not Us Versus Them

On Monday evening, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, a forty-six-year-old black man named George Floyd died in a horrific and terrible way.

As it’s not my goal to detail the events, you can read more about what happened here.

I’m not in the business of passing judgement, or trying to explain who did what and why, but there’s one aspect that I’d like to write about: the fact that we often forget the most inalienable of human rights – human decency.

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How Earl Nightingale’s 12 Rules Can Help You Succeed In Life

It’s probably no big secret that I am a firm believer in personal development. That’s one way to explain it, I guess. It means that I listen to motivational speeches while I work, read everything from popular self-help books to psychology and NLP, and tried all sorts of stuff to get to be more focused, more energetic, and motivated to achieve my goals.

That being said, this list of twelve rules is something that I just have to share with you. 

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Comfort Zone=Danger Zone

We now live in a century of comfort. We’ve become the masters of instant gratification. Everything’s ours with the push of a button.

Want to buy something?

Amazon will deliver it to you.

Want to watch a movie or tv show?

Neftlix and HBO Go.

Want to listen to music?

Spotify.

Anything you want, there’s an app for that.

You don’t even have to talk to another human being on the phone anymore.

But the side effect of this is that comfort is starting to feel like a prison.

In this world of instant gratification, no one wants to do things the hard way anymore. Even rattling the bars of our cage feels like hard work.

And we’ve mistaken comfort for happiness, without realizing that the easier it is to get something, the less you appreciate it.

You do not appreciate what you get for what it is, but for what you have to become to have it.

It’s as simple as that.

As I often say, the struggle alone pleases us, not the victory.

Comfort bypasses the need for transformation as a means to achieving goals, and thus provides us with an opportunity to discard our humanity.

Tough words?

Tell that to those who cry because their iPhones were delivered to them a day later than it was supposed to in a world where two billion people are having trouble finding drinking water.

When we expect everything in life to come fast, cheap, and easy, we’re setting ourselves up for misery and failure.

The truth is that a comfort zone is the place one goes if one wants to die.

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Now, More than Ever, You Need to Be The Hero of Your Own Story

With this pandemic wreaking havoc among us, now it’s the time to become the hero of your own story.

Now, more than ever, you need to be in control of your thoughts and emotions, to be aware of your actions and their consequences.

Here are five ways you can become the hero of you own story during these troubling times…

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The Paradox of Change

“The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change.” – Carl Rogers

Most of us struggle with the issue of identity. We struggle with gaining enough self-confidence and self-esteem in order to properly navigate through life.

And we struggle because we somehow feel inadequate. There’s a voice inside our heads that constantly tells us about flaws and quirks that we’d better keep hidden from others, should we want to be accepted. The negative traits that we try to hide, repress, or change are the ones that end up harming us a lot more than others. Continue reading

Kill Them With Kindness

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” —  Martin Luther King Jr.

Being mean to someone else, particularly when dealing with situations in which the other person is displaying incompetence, is effortless and often quite effective. The result is that you’ve probably ruined their day. It can be difficult to keep cool in such situations, especially when you feel your precious time being wasted, but that’s the thing about being kind: it’s not supposed to be easy.

There’s often a choice to be made: efficient reproach, or less effective, patient kindness.

By choosing the latter, you’ve made the world a slightly better place.

After all, one cannot be kind unless is kind towards those who least deserve it. Continue reading