Review: The Genie Hunt by M.C. Tuggle

Buddy Vuncannon, an attorney in High Point, North Carolina, and his friend Coot Pickard are heading out of town for a fishing weekend when they’re surrounded by a SWAT team. Three eyewitnesses have identified Coot as the gun man in the latest of a string of robberies. To defend Coot, Buddy must stand up to a bullying district attorney, uncover the identity of the real robbers, and battle a powerful genie who serves the robbers. Buddy’s investigation implicates an old friend, reigniting long-forgotten friction between Buddy and Coot. Old and new loyalties clash, leading Buddy and Coot to a desperate chase that forces them to seek the help of a madman they both fear.

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If you’ve read my previous reviews, you know I’m not the one to provide a synopsis of sorts, or write about the usual aspects of storytelling.

What matters most about the book, the essence of it, is the after taste, the way it makes you feel after having read it.

Is it worth it? Do you recommend it? Would you read it again?

The Genie Hunt by M.C. Tuggle is a short, fast read. The supernatural adds an interesting twist to a classical suspense storyline.

The main character, Buddy Vuncannon, is tasked with figuring out what the hell actually happened. He has to unravel the way the events actually unfolded.

This novel makes for an enjoyable read. Imagine reading the script for a popular TV show. Something like that.

Entertaining?

Yeah, I guess that is the right word.

A good, fast read, worth your time, especially if you enjoy the usual mystery with a bit of the occult thrown in there for good measure.

The Genie Hunt is available as an e-book on Amazon.

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Reading Bad Reviews

Whenever a book piques my interest, the first thing I do is go on Amazon or Goodreads and read the bad reviews.

Why?

Because, for once, I believe that by reading the bad reviews you get a better understanding of what works and what doesn’t in that particular book. Also, I’ve found that those who didn’t like the book are particularly more detailed in their reviews. They aren’t just raving about how awesome and freaking amazing that book was. And then I suppose it’s simply because I’m more likely to buy a book that also has some bad reviews. All five star reviews looks pretty suspicious and I just guess that reading about a book’s flaws makes me want to buy it more. Continue reading

Baz Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby

The-Great-Gatsby-Baz-Luhrmann-myLusciousLife.com-Carey-Mulligan-Leonardo-DiCaprioMost of you already know that F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is my favorite novel. I’ve made a custom out of reading it once a year, so I just had to go see the movie on the night it premiered here in Constanta.

And I wasn’t dissapointed.

Baz Luhrmann managed to produce a movie with strange qualities, most of which will appeal only to those who have read and loved Fitzgerald’s novel. When it comes to book to movie adaptations, most producers are maybe too keen to leave their own mark, to change things and show us what they see. Luhrmann shows us how this decade sees this classic novel, how our decade sees decadence and opulence and slowly peels off all the greedy, dark layers of human nature in this modern world. Continue reading

Mr. Nobody

How difficult is it to take a decision? One you’ll never take back? What if you’d know where that decision is going to take you?

Mr. Nobody ( as opposed to my short story) is a 2009 movie starring Jared Leto as Nemo Nobody,  a 118 years old man telling a reporter all about the labyrinth of decisions that is his life. Continue reading

About Paid Advertisements

I have read a lot about paying for ads. Most review blogs have this option. You can advertise on Goodreads, Google AdWords, or even Facebook. I know that some writers have been pleased with the results, but I don’t think paid advertising, in case of self-published books, is very helpful. Continue reading