On Being Kind to Those Who Least Deserve It

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Destiny is not what happens to you, but how you react to what happens to you.

There’s this story about Winston Churchill who, after the Japanese bombed Hong Kong and Singapore, forcing Great Britain to declare war, he signed off with the following words, “I have the honour to be, with high consideration, Sir, Your obedient servant.”

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How to Let Go of Limiting Beliefs

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For most of my twenties, there were so many things I didn’t want to be true about myself, yet I somehow thought them to be facts.

I believed I was quite unlovable, which was my excuse for not trying to be worthy of love in any way. I believed I’d always struggle financially, so I made no serious effort to earn more, to save more, or to build multiple streams of income.

I believed that life was harsh, that people didn’t like me for being skinny, kind of ugly, and not nearly as charming as everyone else, so I lived in a state of perpetual fear — I somehow expected the world to decide that I wasn’t worthy of living on this planet anymore and send me off to spend the rest of my life on the dark side of the moon or something.

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It’s Not About How Much Money You Save, It’s About How Much Mental Energy You Spend

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I don’t usually write about money, but there’s a trend that I couldn’t help but disagree with.

If you want to save money, you’ve got to spend less.

It makes sense. It’s clever, it’s helpful, and it’s the kind of counterproductive advice that has the potential to make a lot of people miserable.

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10,000 Hours of Procrastination

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In his 2008 release, Outliers, journalist Malcolm Gladwell introduced the notion that one has to spend 10,000 hours working at their craft before they can become a true master.

Now, even though the idea is catchy, and it’s a valid one indeed, there’s a lot to be said about the kind of work one has to put. It’s not just work-work, but it’s working towards mastery, a competitive and aggressive way of working towards bettering yourself day in and day out.

10,000 hours of that, and you’ll become so good they can’t ignore you.

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If You Don’t Get at Least a Hundred Likes on Your Selfies, Are You Even an Influencer?

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Some days I spend too much time on social media. It’s addictive, I get it. It’s also probably one of the primary causes of depression and anxiety among Millenials.

It is what it is.

But today I don’t want to talk about us comparing our day to day lives with the highlight reel of the rich and famous.

Today I want to talk about those who pretend to be rich and famous for likes and shares and a bit of money.

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This Is Why You Need to Hit Rock Bottom in Order to Rebuild Yourself

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Rock bottom is never the end. It’s only the beginning.

“When this ultimate crisis comes… when there is no way out — that is the very moment when we explode from within and the totally other emerges: the sudden surfacing of a strength, a security of unknown origin, welling up from beyond reason, rational expectation, and hope.”

Émile Durkheim

I remember watching one of Jim Rohn’s speeches. He was sharing with the audience the story of being 25, a college graduate, freshly married, and not being able to afford to pay the girl scouts who knocked at his door to sell him cookies.

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The 5 People Who Will Break Your Heart in Your 20s

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Ah, your twenties. A decade of marvelous growth, decadent spending, and quite a few heartbreaks. Just like the 1920s.

That’s when you figure out a lot about life. What your teachers didn’t want to tell you, didn’t like to tell you, or didn’t know enough about to tell you.

That’s when you’ll probably fall in and out of love with life, with your soulmate, with your passion. That’s when you will get your heart broken, and when you should fail at something you were passionate about.

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Tell Yourself This Sentence Whenever You Go Through a Dark Night of the Soul

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There’s a fascinating story about the biblical King Solomon. It is said that he was searching for a cure against depression. He assembled his wise men together, which gave him the following advice: to craft himself a ring engraved with the words ‘This too will pass.’

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Every Struggle Is Like Mud

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“Every struggle is like mud — there are always some lotus seeds waiting to sprout.”
Amit Ray

I am writing these words to you, who are struggling. I am writing these words to let you know that this is the moment when you want your dream to come true, but it doesn’t.

You gave it your best shot, but it didn’t happen.

And this dream of yours, it could be anything. Writing a book, starting a business, landing a new job, losing a few extra pounds, or finding your soulmate.

It’s what you want to be doing, what you know you should be doing, but you’re struggling. You want to throw in the towel.

Because it’s not working out. It’s all setbacks and restlessness and this pitch darkness when you think about the future. It’s no visible progress. It’s fear and anger and bitterness and envy, all mixed up together, all demons afraid of each other.

Maybe that’s not your thing, after all? Or are you paying your dues?

Are you wasting your time or are you on the way to success?

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Don’t Turn Your Back on Mental Discomfort

What happens when you venture into the center of your fears

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What often stands in the way of our dreams and goals is an innate, biological reaction to anything unknown, anything that might get us killed, hurt, or rejected by others.

In short, the lizard brain.

Not only do we turn our backs on fear, but we also tend to rationalize it in such a way that it makes it seem like nothing happened.

In order to avoid mental pain, we come up with the most bizarre excuses possible.

I don’t have a driver’s license because I don’t like to drive. Truth is, I never believed I could save enough money to buy a car, so I rationalized myself out of mental discomfort.

The truth? I was afraid.

So what can I do about fear? Not in a temporary manner, but rather in a way that changes me from the inside and transforms my life?

It’s simple. I should make it my aim to never turn my back on mental discomfort.

Life is pain, and I should accept it and even learn to appreciate the moments of fear and discomfort as they allow me to better myself.

The game of life is simple: we either venture into the center of our fears, and we grow, or we turn our backs on fear, and we stagnate or worse.

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